Tag Archives: art

This Man Is Able to Reproduce Meticulously Accurate Cityscapes After A Single Fly-Over (Video)

They call him the human camera.

Stephen Wiltshire was born in London in 1974. As a child, Stephen was a mute. At the age of three he was diagnosed as autistic, and in that same year his father died in a motorcycle accident.

At five he was sent to the Queensmill School for the autistic in London. The instructors there discovered that Stephen had an intense passion for art. Even as a child, his skill and attention to detail was exceptional.

A drawing Stephen did of St. Paul’s Cathedral when he was 9. Click to enlarge (Courtesy of the Stephen Wiltshire Gallery)

They used this passion to help teach him to talk. Stephen was a mute, and avoided communication with others as much as possible.

So his instructors at Queensmill would take away his art supplies when he wasn’t using them so that he was forced to communicate with them when he wanted to draw again. He started with just sounds, but eventually he said his first word: “paper”.

He learned to speak fully at the age of nine. By that time, his passion for art was already extremely developed. His favorite subjects were American cars (he’s said to have an encyclopedic knowledge of them) and the buildings of London.

A young Stephen Wiltshire thoroughly enjoying a catalog of architecture. Click to enlarge (Courtesy of the Stephen Wiltshire Gallery)

During his time at Queensmill, Stephen’s instructors discovered that he had an extraordinary gift: he was able to reproduce extremely intricate sketches after seeing an image only once.

As an adult, Stephen used this skill to jump-start his career as an architectural artist by flying over massive cities and then reproducing huge, elaborate sketches of the cities, down to the number of windows in each building and the clothes on clothing lines.

I’ve gathered a few videos showcasing his mind-blowing talent. Enjoy!

Stephen draws New York City for UBS’s “We Will Not Rest” campaign in 2011:

Stephen draws Rome after flying over it for the first time:

Stephen draws Singapore after a helicopter fly-over (time-lapse):

Stephen takes on his largest ever panoramic drawing: a nearly 360 degree image of Tokyo:

Stephen is what is known as an autistic savant. Autistic savants have damage to the left anterior lobe of the brain, which plays a key role in processing sensory input and forming memories.

Because of this, they are able to access lower-level information like the extremely intricate details of buildings in Stephen’s works of art.

This information actually exists in all of our brains, but it’s normally unavailable to our conscious awareness because our brains classify this information as superfluous or non-essential.

However, studies and controversial experiments have proved that we can tap into these same talents by using transcranial magnetic stimulation: temporarily shutting down parts of the left anterior lobe using magnets.

Check out the video below to see how it effected creativity and other brain functions in the fascinating video below:

To view more of Stephen’s work and learn more about his life, you can visit his website, The Stephen Wiltshire Gallery.

12 Pieces of Street Art That Seamlessly Mesh With the Nature Around Them (Photo Gallery)

Street art is one of the more creative art forms around today. Because of its visibility, it is often used to make political or social statements, like the street art that emerged in Brazil before and during the World Cup.

But some street artists like to use their work to bring out parts of the natural environment that we might otherwise take for granted. Check out some of the best examples below (click an image to enlarge):

(h/t Bored Panda)

If These Photos of Dogs Underwater Don’t Make You Smile, Nothing Will (Photo Gallery)

Seth Casteel is a photographer based out of Chicago and Los Angeles who specializes in taking pictures of animals.

Though he photographs all types of animals, dogs are one of his favorite subjects. A few years back, he shot a series of photos of dogs playing underwater. Check out the pictures below (click an image to enlarge):

The success of the photos landed him a book deal, and the photo-book “Underwater Dogs” was released in October of 2012.

Casteel’s photography company, Little Friend’s Photography, specializes in lifestyle pet photography. Casteel describes this art form as,

“embracing the at-ease mentality of pets on location in the natural surroundings.”

You can check out more of Casteel’s work on Little Friend’s Photography’s website here.

(h/t CBS News)

This Guy’s Art Looks Like A Bunch of Trash… Until You See It From the Right Angle (GIFs and Gallery)

Bernard Pras is a French painter, photographer and sculptor with an amazing eye for perspective.

His art style in called anamorposis. It involves creating a distorted projection that can only be correctly viewed from one specific angle. Pras is a master, using all kinds of random odds and ends to create images with stunning detail.

Pras built the piece below as a memorial to Malian actor Sotigui Kouyaté (who played a major role in building a bridge between African and western culture) after he passed away in 2005.

He used clothes, paint, wood, rubber, and a number of other random objects that he scavenged from the installation site.

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Some close ups:

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Here’s another example of one of his pieces photographed from two different angles (it’s a portrait of famous surrealist painter Salvador Dali):

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And another…

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Check out more of Pras’s work below. Click an image to enlarge.

You can view all of Pras’s gallery on his website here.

(h/t ThisIsCollosal and Inspiration Green)

This Guy’s Black Light Bodyscapes Might Be the Coolest Art I’ve Ever Seen (Photo Gallery)

“Cherish something different.”

This is the motto of John Poppleton, one of the most creative photographers and artists you will ever hear of.

John combines UV paints with black light photography to create breathtaking bodyscape images on his human canvases. You can check out some of his work below (click an image to enlarge).

John calls black light photogrpahy the “fourth dimension”. It allows him to use an invisible light source to turn his human subjects into the light source, which gives his photos amazing vibrance and depth.

You can watch this short bio video to learn more about the artist. You can also read a transcript of an interview he did with Petapixel here.

You can check out more of his work on his website here.

This Guy’s Mind-Twisting Artwork Is Incredible (Photo Gallery)

Martin de Pasquale is a photographer and digital artist from Buenos Aires, Argentina. He combines amazing photography with photo-manipulating programs like Photoshop, Poser and 3DS Max to create amazing surreal images.

But computer programs alone aren’t enough to make these incredible images- they require meticulous planning ahead of time, like making sure the lighting is consistent. It’s also important that the angles at which images are taken is precise. You can read more about the process from Gizmodo.

Check out some of Pasquale’s best work below. Click an image to enlarge.

You can check out more of Pasquale’s work here.

This New Pen Will Allow You To Draw With Any Color You Can Find

Many artists (and wanna-bes, like myself) dream of being able to sample colors directly from their environment and transfer them to canvas.

Well that dream will soon be a reality, with the Scribble Pen. The innovative has an RGB (red/green/blue) color sensor at the top- point it at any consistent shade and press the button on the side and the pen saves that shade into its internal computer.

The computer then uses the pen’s five-color ink cartridge to create the sampled color.

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The pens are powered by a rechargeable lithium-ion battery, and have 1 GB of capacity, enough to hold 100,000 colors, according to its designers. They are also equipped with a micro-USB port, allowing you to connect them to a computing or mobile device (they’re compatible with iOS, Android and Windows phones) .

Scribble offers the pen in two forms: the classic pen, which can draw on paper, or a stylus pen, which allows you to doodle on your tablet. They are not yet for sale, but if you’re interested, you can sign up for an alert that will let you know when they’re available.

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In a press release, an anonymous spokesman had this to say about the new technology:

“For the color blind, kids, interior decorators, homeowners, teachers, artists, photographers, designers and students the Scribble color picker pen will make copying an exact color, any color from any object an absolute breeze.”

You can visit Scribble’s homepage here to learn more.

(h/t IFL Science)

This Inventive Artist Uses Flower Pedals To Create Breathtaking Gown Designs (Pictures)

Grace Ciao is a 22-year old business student and artist from Singapore. Rather than paints, pencils or ink, however, Grace uses flower pedals as her medium. She claims that she stumbled upon the idea on accident, after trying to preserve a flower given to her by a boy.

“They help me create prints which I otherwise couldn’t have thought of… I think petals work really well for illustration also because their delicacy and exquisiteness mimic those of a soft fabric,”

she told Buzzfeed in a recent interview. Check out some of her awesome designs below. Click an image to enlarge:

Grace also does watercolor illustrations. You can see more of her artwork on her website, www.graceciao.com.

(h/t Bored Panda)

NASA Made an Amazing Mosaic of Earth Using Over 36,000 Selfies Taken All Across the Globe

Last month, NASA set out to create a “global selfie”. First, they asked people around the world to take pictures of themselves with a little NASA placard saying where they were. They then compiled the 36,422 selfies they got into a stunningly accurate mosaic of the Earth.

A close up of part of the mosaic (Courtesy of NASA)

For Earth Day (April 22), NASA used social media to pose the question, “Where are you on Earth right now?”, encouraging fans and followers to take selfies and post them using the hashtag #GlobalSelfie.

Selfies were taken on every continent (including Antarctica), and 113 different countries and regions were represented. Each picture was used as a tile on the earth, creating a fully zoomable global mosaic that you can view by clicking the image below.

Everybody got in on the fun, including Elmo, a lego pilot, an astronaut and even a lazy cat. Check out some of the coolest selfie submissions below.

(h/t RT)

What Does Your Favorite Alcoholic Drink Look Like Under A Microscope? (Pictures)

Back in 2010, a company called Bevshots came up with a pretty cool idea: photographing beverages under a microscope.

To accomplish this, they put a drop of each drink onto slides, and then let them dry out in an airtight container. Once the alcohol had dried on the slide, it was photographed with a 35mm lens and then magnified up to 1000x. The result is breathtaking.

Check out pictures of different drinks and cocktails below. Click an image to enlarge.

Cocktails are typically made of many different ingredients, including fruits containing citric acids and complex sugars, which is why they tend to create images with more diverse shapes and colors.

The process was painstaking. Some of the drinks required up to 200 attempts before the Bevshots team got a picture of a slide that captured all of the various components.

You can purchase prints, apparel, bar accessories and more from Bevshots.com.