Tag Archives: earth

Vote For Who You Think Deserves National Geographic’s $50,000 “Expedition-Granted” Prize! (Video)

The wonderful people at National Geographic are hosting another awesome youth-inspiring contest that will award a $50,000 grant to help fund a winning team’s nature expedition. The contest opened its doors to entries from all over, with the only parameters being that the expedition idea pushes boundaries and forges new territory. Unfortunately the doors have been closed for new entries, but the lucky projects that have been recognized as finalists for this year’s grant include all types of expeditions, from

Earth’s Magnetic Field Is Weakening 10x Faster Than Previously Thought

We often take it for granted that the North Pole is at the top of the globe and the South Pole is at the bottom. But in reality, these poles have flip-flopped a number of times in Earth’s history, the most recent being about 780,000 years ago. Each flip is preceded by a gradual weakening of the magnetic field. Since the early 2000s, scientists have been predicting that the next polar flip would happen in the next 5,000 years or so, based

Did You Know You Can Take A Virtual Tour of One of The US’s Coolest Museums!?!

The Smithsonian National Museum Of Natural History located in Washington, D.C. opened in 1910 and is still one of the United State’s most visited and celebrated museums. The museum itself is pretty massive. According to Smithsonian’s website… “The main building on the National Mall contains 1.5 million square feet of space overall and 325,000 square feet of exhibition and public space; altogether the Museum is the size of 18 football fields, and houses over 1000 employees.”   At the heart of

This Artist Used Copper Orbs to Show You the Permanent Costs of Mining (Pictures)

Dillon Marsh is a South African artist who focuses on capturing how human activity re-shapes and often scars the environment. Recently, Marsh has been focused on the impacts of mining, which is a major industry in his home country of South Africa. Marsh was also intrigued by the challenge of trying to create a visual representation of the effects of mining which, unlike many environmentally-damaging practices, happens very gradually: “Air and water pollution, acid mine drainage, toxic waste and abandoned, non-rehabilitated mines

The Coolest Places On Earth: Reed Flute Caves- Guangxi, China (Photos)

Guilin is a city of about 5 million people located in the Guangxi region of southeast China. The city, which was officially established around 111 BC, is rich with Chinese history and culture. But Guilin also has another claim to fame: the Reed Flute Cave. This natural limestone cave is 180 million years old, and has been one of Guilin’s main tourist attractions for over 1200 years. The cave was named for the reeds which grow outside of its entrance. These reeds

Pictures That Show You Just How Extreme California’s Current Drought Is

If you weren’t aware, California is going through a very serious drought. 2013 saw the lowest rainfall numbers in California’s recorded history, and 2014 has been by far the hottest year on record for the state, according to the NOAA. The Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) is a standardized metric which compares long-term droughts by looking at rainfall, temperature and soil moisture levels. The scale goes from +6 (very wet), to -6 (very dry). Anything below a -4 is considered

“Nuestra Tierra—Our Earth”: A Breathtaking Time-Lapse Of Earth From Space (Video)

Using footage from the International Space Station (courtesy of NASA’s Johnson Space Center), National Geographic filmmaker Fede Castro has created one of the most breathtaking time-lapse videos of Earth from space. The video is just over four minutes, and features the world’s major cities, as well as the aurora borealis (Northern Lights) and a few massive thunderstorms, among other things. Take a trip around the world in just minutes in National Geographic’s video “Nuestra Tierra—Our Earth”: Video soundtrack: Divergence – The Black Parrot

Beijing’s Simple Yet Effective Idea to Get People to Recycle (Video)

China has become notorious in recent years for its high levels of air pollution. This, however, is only one of many issues facing China as the country’s middle class continues to grow. Beijing, China’s capital city, is home to around 20 million people. As a result, the city produces a lot of trash. On a number of occasions, academics have attempted to estimate just how much trash Beijing produces. They have all failed, due in large part to the fact that the massive

Mesmerizing Visualization Shows the Spread of Western Culture Over the Past 2,000 Years (Video)

Dr. Maximilian Schich is a professor of art and technology at the University of Texas at Dallas. His current research focuses on how the spread of the arts and sciences affected the spread of culture. To illustrate this process, he decided to map the movements of 100,000 of the most influential figures of western culture from the past 2,000 years. Among the names were people like Apple founder Steve Jobs, Pride and Prejudice author Jane Austen, and the famous artist and inventor Leonardo da Vinci. Schich gathered information

The Living Root Bridges of Meghalaya, India (Photo Gallery)

Earlier this week, I was watching an episode of the BBC series Human Planet and saw clips of some amazing, natural-looking root bridges in India. I immediately wanted to know more about them. Cherrapunji is a subdivisional town in the East Khasi Hills district in the Indian state of Meghalaya. With over 75 feet of annual rainfall, the climate in this region is one of the wettest in the world. The intense rains have created a perpetually wet and often harsh

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