Tag Archives: education

Malala Yousafzai Donates World Children’s Prize Money to Rebuild Gaza Schools

Malala Yousafzai is a 17-year old education activist from Pakistan who gained worldwide fame after surviving multiple gunshot wounds in an attack by the Taliban. On October 10th, she became the youngest ever winner of the Nobel Peace Prize for her work in championing the right to equal education for all children. This past Wednesday (Oct. 29), Malala received another award for her work: the World Children’s Prize, which came with a $50,000 cash prize. In her acceptance speech, Malala announced that she

This Guy Passed Out 520,000 Sandwiches to the Hungry Last Year (Video)

They call him “The Sandwich Man” – and for good reason. Every night for almost 13 years now, Allan Law loads up his mini-van with sandwiches and other basic necessities and drives around the streets of Minneapolis, giving them away to those in need. Law witnessed the effects of poverty firsthand when working as a 5th grade and 6th grade teacher in the inner-city of Minneapolis from the late 60s all the way up until his retirement in 1999. But

Democratic Education: A New Way to Look at Teaching and Learning (Opinion Piece)

Seven-year-old Penelope Day needs both hands to pick up the power drill. Penelope is spending the week at a day camp run by Construction Kids, a Brooklyn-based program that offers building classes throughout the year for kids as young as 2 years old. It’s one of a new and immensely popular wave of programs trying to shift kids away from computer screens toward actual, hands-on activities. Like building things from scratch. Using, yes, real, working power tools. With help from a team of

Malala Yousafzai and Kailash Satyarthi: Nobel-Winning Children’s Rights Activists

Regarded as an emblem of prestige and honor across the globe, The Nobel Peace Prize is awarded annually to people making outstanding contributions to the overall betterment of the world. The recipients of this award have included political leaders, social activists, and organizations that have acted as catalysts for change. On Friday, October 10, Malala Yousafzai and Kailash Satyarthi were announced as the most recent laureates of the Prize. Despite significant obstacles, unceasing dedication to improvement encouraged both Yousafzai and Satyarthi to make

The Re-Segregation of American Public Schools (Infographic)

In the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case in 1954, the Supreme Court ruled that separate schools for different races were inherently unequal, legally ending the practice of public school segregation. It was a major step. Schools slowly began to integrate, leading to better academic achievement amongst minorities. Unfortunately, this integration peaked in 1988, and since the government released all schools from federal oversight in 1992, America’s public schools are looking more and more like they did before desegregation. One striking

This Awesome Video Lets You Experience Chemistry’s Most Mesmerizing Reactions Up Close!

Since so much of chemistry happens faster, slower, or on a much smaller scale than we’re used to, the science is often taken for granted by the average person. But what if we were able to shrink ourselves down to the microscopic level and had the ability to control just how fast or slow a reaction happened? This is what Tsinghua University Press and the University of Science and Technology of China had in mind when they came together to create the

Can A Suicide Bomber Be a Hero? Or, In This Case, A Heroine?

As I write this, ISIS fighters are slowly taking the city of Kobane in northern Syria, just miles from the Turkish border. With fighting raging outside the city for the past three weeks, nearly 160,000 Syrians, mostly Kurds, have fled the city. Kobane is being valiantly defended by Syrian Kurdish fighters. Last night, The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reported that one of these defenders, a young Kurdish woman named Arin Mirkin, blew herself up (along with a number of ISIS fighters) after a long battle with the

Germany Just Scrapped ALL Their Tuition Fees- Can We Can Get A Break Here in the US??

While the average college graduate in the United States is graduating with about $30,000 in student loan debt, Germany has decided that even much lower levels of tuition are simply unacceptable. The state of Lower Saxony, in northwest Germany, was the last of the country’s 16 states to do away with tuition fees. Dorothee Stapelfeldt is a senator in Hamburg, Germany’s second largest city. She is also head of Hamburg’s Department of Science and Research. She spoke to The Times about the

45% of Russians Believe A Global Shadow Government Controls the World

Consider the following statement: “The world is run by some sort of overarching entity that pulls the strings in governments around the globe.” While groups like NATO, the United Nations and the G20 all include some of the biggest and most influential nations in the world, most people would probably say that the statement above is a bit of a stretch. Unless, of course, you live in Russia. A recent poll carried out by the Russian Public Opinion Research Center found that a whopping 45% of Russians agreed

New Study: Millennials Are Actually Reading MORE Than Their Elders

I’m sure you’ve heard it before: the media lamenting on how lost the young generation is, how addicted we are to technology, how we’re dumbing ourselves down and losing touch with our societal roots. But at least one study seems to be contradicting this characterization of young people as ignorant internet addicts. The study, published by the Pew Research Center last week, found that 88% of Americans between the ages of 16 and 29 claimed to have read at least one book over the

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