Tag Archives: physics

The Physics Behind Why Cats Always Land On Their Feet (Video)

Almost everyone knows that cats have an extraordinary ability to land on their feet, even if they start out upside down. But how are they actually able to do this? Destin, founder of the popular youtube channel SmarterEveryDay, recently broke down the science behind how cats are seemingly able to always land on their feet. He posed the following question: How does a cat go from feet up to feet down in a falling reference frame without violating the conservation of angular momentum?

Forget Everything You Thought You Knew About “Horsepower”

Every time the newest model of truck or car comes out, the car manufacturers loves to tell you how much “horsepower” the vehicle has, conjuring up visions of muscular stallions galloping through the countryside. But I put the term “horsepower” in quotes because these visions are misleading. See, in our modern world, horsepower is simply a scientific unit that we accept as a standard. But to understand what it actually means, you have to understand where it actually comes from. The

A 3-D Printed Robot Flying A Prototype for a Quadcopter Hoverbike (Video)

Back in May, I wrote an article about a futuristic new hoverbike called the Aero-X set to go on sale in 2017. Now it seems that the Aero-X may have some serious competition. A company called Malloy Aeronautics recently completely a successful Kickstarter campaign for a similar hoverbike that uses four helicopter bladed instead of two, adding additional control, stability and maneuverability to the craft. Though they haven’t yet built a full-size model, Malloy Aeronautics has built a 1/3 scale model that they’re

Just How Big Was the Biggest Bird Ever?

25-28 million years ago, a massive seabird known as Pelagornis sandersi dominated the skies. With wingspans reaching up to 24 feet in length, P. sandersi’s wingspan was more than twice as large as the largest living bird capable of flight, the Royal Albatross (which can have a wingspan of up to 11.5 feet). P. sandersi‘s wingspan was also… As big as many World War I fighter jets: Longer than three Yao Mings lined up head to toe: And longer than most adult anacondas: The bird was so

The Revolutionary New Propulsion Engine That Even Scientists Didn’t Believe Was Possible

Roger Shawyer is one of the most persistent and driven individuals in the world. For years, he has been working on a new type of propulsion engine that could theoretically run forever without needing any fuel. He calls his device the EmDrive. The engine works by bouncing around microwave radiation in a small space to produce thrust, rather than burning a propellant fuel. The microwaves are produced by solar power which is generated from panels on the outside of the engine.

Two More Mysterious Giant Holes Emerge In Siberia (Pictures)

About two weeks ago, I reported on a giant crater that appeared on the Yamal peninsula in Siberia. Well, while scientists are still trying to figure out what caused this first crater, two more have been discovered in Siberia. Crater of Antipayuta This crater was alo discovered on the Yamal peninsula, near the village of Antipayuta (a few hundred miles from the first crater). It measures 50 feet in diameter. Mikhail Lapsui is a deputy of the regional parliament in the

Watch A 5,078-Foot-Long Bridge Get Destroyed In Seconds (Video)

A 54-year-old bridge was demolished in Cleveland this past weekend. The bridge originally opened in 1959. It spanned 8 lanes, and at 166 feet it was the widest bridge in Ohio at the time. The bridge connected downtown Cleveland with the Cuyahoga River Valley. The video below shows a slow motion destruction of the 128-foot-tall 5,078-foot-long structure (it begins about 30 seconds in). The Ohio Department of Transportation demolished the bridge to replace it with two new structures. Check out a concept image

The World’s Tallest Waterslide Just Opened- Here’s How It Looks to Ride It (Video)

“Verrückt” is the German word for “insane”. It is a fitting name for the world’s tallest waterslide, which was just opened to the public at the Schlitterbahn Water Park in Kansas City. At 168 feet and 7 inches, the Verrückt is taller than Niagara Falls. To get the top you have to climb 268 stairs. John Schooley was the engineer who designed the slide. Here he is talking about when he and park founder Jeff Henry came up with the idea: “Basically,

The Story of the Man Who Only Made $10 for Figuring Out How to Make Diamonds

In 1772, French nobleman and chemist Antoine Lavoisier used a lens to concentrate the sun (magnifying-glass style) on a diamond in an atmosphere of oxygen. The diamond released only carbon dioxide (CO2), proving that diamonds were made up only of carbon. Then in 1779, English chemist Smithson Tennant further bolstered the findings by burning both graphite (which is also composed completely of carbon) and diamonds, and showing that the amount of gas produced by the two minerals matched the chemical equivalence he had established for

Superheated Liquid Nitrogen in a Vacuum Does Some Crazy Things… (Video)

Liquid nitrogen has one of the lowest boiling points of any known substance at -321ºF, which is why anything that comes in contact with the substance is usually flash-frozen. A substance’s boiling point varies with air pressure. For example, at sea level, water boils at 100ºC (212ºF). But at the top of Mt. Everest, where the air pressure is only about a third of what it is at sea level, water will boil at 71ºC (160ºF). So as the air is sucked

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