Tag Archives: psychology

Democratic Education: A New Way to Look at Teaching and Learning (Opinion Piece)

Seven-year-old Penelope Day needs both hands to pick up the power drill. Penelope is spending the week at a day camp run by Construction Kids, a Brooklyn-based program that offers building classes throughout the year for kids as young as 2 years old. It’s one of a new and immensely popular wave of programs trying to shift kids away from computer screens toward actual, hands-on activities. Like building things from scratch. Using, yes, real, working power tools. With help from a team of

MRI’s Reveal How Some People Have a 6th Sense for Predicting Market Bubbles

In 2008, the American economy fell into a major recession following the collapse of the housing bubble. How did this bubble form? Basically, the government made it extremely easy to get a home loan, even if you didn’t really have the means to pay it back. As a result, everybody started buying and selling houses like hot cakes. Even when real estate prices became clearly higher than the actual value of the properties, people kept buying, in the hopes that they could re-sell at an

Why Students Chose to Shock Themselves Rather Than Sit Alone With Their Thoughts

We live in a world saturated with sensory stimulations. From our cell phones to our laptops and TVs, almost our entire day is a marathon of sights and sounds, all competing for our increasingly short attention spans. So you would think most people would enjoy the opportunity to get away from it all and gather their thoughts. But a recent study from the University of Virginia found quite the opposite. In fact, many of the participants even started giving themselves electric shocks as

How Scientists Predicted With 70% Accuracy Which 14-Year-Olds Would Be Binge Drinkers By 16

Five years ago, Robert Whelan, a former postdoctoral fellow in psychiatry at University of Vermont (UVM) and current lecturer at University College in Dublin, joined forces with Hugh Garavan, associate professor of psychiatry at UVM. The pair of psychiatric researchers wanted to see if they could determine the factors that predicted binge drinking in teens. In the largest longitudinal (long-term) adolescent brain imaging study to date, they gathered 2,400 14-year-olds from 8 regions across Europe, putting each of them through 10 hours

Facebook Just Manipulated the Emotions of 700,000 Users Without Informing Them

When you sign up for Facebook, you have to agree to a whole laundry list of fine-print terms and conditions (which almost nobody ever reads). One of the things you consent to is Facebook’s Data Use Policy, which gives Facebook the right to use your info for, “…troubleshooting, data analysis, testing, research and service improvement.” Well, it seems that Facebook has taken full advantage of the “research” portion of that agreement. A study published two weeks ago in the Proceedings of the National Academy of

Soldiers Who Kill In Combat Are LESS Likely to Abuse Alcohol? Yes, According to This Study

killing and alcohol

Going to war is one of the most traumatic experiences anyone could ever imagine enduring. Every year, hundreds of soldiers return home from combat with serious cases of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Struggling to re-adjust back into civilian society while simultaneously trying to cope with the psychological side-effects of being exposed to combat often leads war veterans to abuse alcohol and other drugs. But a new study co-authored by Cristel Russell, a marketing professor with American University’s Kogod School of Business, and researchers from the Walter Reed

A New Study from Stanford University Found That Walking Can Increase Creativity By Up to 60%

Have you ever been dealing with a particularly difficult situation and decided to take a walk to clear your head? Well, a new study from Stanford suggests that there is real scientific evidence that walking improves your creative thinking. The recently published study was co-authored by Marily Oppezzo, a Stanford doctoral graduate in the field of educational psychology, and Daniel Schwartz, a professor of education at Stanford. To test out the theory, the researchers compared levels of creative thinking under a number of different conditions:

The Myth of the 12-Step Addiction Program: How It Actually Hurts Addicts

Dr. Lance Dodes is a psychiatrist and the author of the recently released book The Sober Truth: Debunking the Bad Science Behind 12-Step Programs and the Rehab Industry. He sat down for an interview with NPR last Sunday to talk about his book and its critiques of AA programs and the 12-step method. He started off by pointing to the extremely low success rate of 12-step programs. While the rehab industry constantly publicizes the success stories, it is also trying to draw attention

How Attempted Suicide Cured a Man’s OCD

The man, identified only as George, suffered from extreme obsessive-compulsive disorder, washing his hands hundreds of times a day and taking excessively frequent showers. At the age of 19, George shot himself in the head, hoping to end the pain of OCD for good. He succeeded, but not at all in the way he had planned. Miraculously, the bullet actually destroyed the left frontal lobe, the region of the brain that controls this obsessive behavior, without causing major damage to any

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