Tag Archives: science

Did You Know You Can Take A Virtual Tour of One of The US’s Coolest Museums!?!

The Smithsonian National Museum Of Natural History located in Washington, D.C. opened in 1910 and is still one of the United State’s most visited and celebrated museums. The museum itself is pretty massive. According to Smithsonian’s website… “The main building on the National Mall contains 1.5 million square feet of space overall and 325,000 square feet of exhibition and public space; altogether the Museum is the size of 18 football fields, and houses over 1000 employees.”   At the heart of

UK Sets Plans To Launch Their First Commercial Spaceport As Soon As 2016

At the Farnborough International Airshow’s Space Day Conference this past July, UK Space Agency Director General David Parker announced a timetable which laid out the groundwork for the Agency’s first commercial spaceport. The Agency made the decision to build a spaceport in anticipation of the growing demand for space tourism and the expanding space plane industry. The timetable estimates that by 2030, space tourism will be bringing in about $65 million a year and the space plane industry will be worth around $33.9 billion. These potential future

Did You Know… The First Video of Earth from Space Was Captured In 1946?

Most people have heard of the Space Race, a period of about 20 years from the mid-1950s to the early 1970s when the United States and Russia feverishly developed their space programs in a constant attempt to one up each other. The race was kicked off in earnest by the Russians when they launched Sputnik (the world’s first artificial satellite) on the evening of October 4, 1957. What many people don’t know, however, is that nearly 11 years before Sputnik, a team of

The Physics Behind Why Cats Always Land On Their Feet (Video)

Almost everyone knows that cats have an extraordinary ability to land on their feet, even if they start out upside down. But how are they actually able to do this? Destin, founder of the popular youtube channel SmarterEveryDay, recently broke down the science behind how cats are seemingly able to always land on their feet. He posed the following question: How does a cat go from feet up to feet down in a falling reference frame without violating the conservation of angular momentum?

Forget Everything You Thought You Knew About “Horsepower”

Every time the newest model of truck or car comes out, the car manufacturers loves to tell you how much “horsepower” the vehicle has, conjuring up visions of muscular stallions galloping through the countryside. But I put the term “horsepower” in quotes because these visions are misleading. See, in our modern world, horsepower is simply a scientific unit that we accept as a standard. But to understand what it actually means, you have to understand where it actually comes from. The

This Amazing Ant Behavior Is Leaving Even Ant Experts Dumbfounded (Video)

Recently, a video surfaced of ants doing something quite amazing: forming multiple daisy chains to pull a massive centipede (presumably back towards their colony). Check out the amazing video below: According to Terry McGlynn, an Entomologist at Cal State University at Dominguez Hills, the video shows a species of Leptogenys ant somewhere in southeast Asia. What really shocked McGlynn about the video was that even ant experts had never witnessed this particular behavior before. Don’t get me wrong, ants have a long history

A 3-D Printed Robot Flying A Prototype for a Quadcopter Hoverbike (Video)

Back in May, I wrote an article about a futuristic new hoverbike called the Aero-X set to go on sale in 2017. Now it seems that the Aero-X may have some serious competition. A company called Malloy Aeronautics recently completely a successful Kickstarter campaign for a similar hoverbike that uses four helicopter bladed instead of two, adding additional control, stability and maneuverability to the craft. Though they haven’t yet built a full-size model, Malloy Aeronautics has built a 1/3 scale model that they’re

Just How Big Was the Biggest Bird Ever?

25-28 million years ago, a massive seabird known as Pelagornis sandersi dominated the skies. With wingspans reaching up to 24 feet in length, P. sandersi’s wingspan was more than twice as large as the largest living bird capable of flight, the Royal Albatross (which can have a wingspan of up to 11.5 feet). P. sandersi‘s wingspan was also… As big as many World War I fighter jets: Longer than three Yao Mings lined up head to toe: And longer than most adult anacondas: The bird was so

Chinese Boy Receives First 3-D Printed Vertebra Implant (Video)

Doctors at Beijing’s Peking University have made a truly monumental step in the field of orthopedic surgery: implanting the first ever 3-D printed vertebra into a 12-year old boy. After he suffered a neck injury while playing soccer, it was discovered that the boy had a malignant tumor on his spinal chord. Following an examination of the tumor, the boy’s doctors decided that their only choice was to remove his entire second vertebra. But rather than replacing it with a traditional orthopedic implant, the

Pictures That Show You Just How Extreme California’s Current Drought Is

If you weren’t aware, California is going through a very serious drought. 2013 saw the lowest rainfall numbers in California’s recorded history, and 2014 has been by far the hottest year on record for the state, according to the NOAA. The Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) is a standardized metric which compares long-term droughts by looking at rainfall, temperature and soil moisture levels. The scale goes from +6 (very wet), to -6 (very dry). Anything below a -4 is considered

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